European Editor


Reviews wines from Portugal and France.

Beaujolais Wines

Beaujolais is sometimes thought of as part of Burgundy, because so many of the Burgundy wine companies have expanded their reach to include wines from the Beaujolais wine region. But Beaujolais wines deserve to stand apart, not least because they are made from an entirely different grape — Gamay. Grown on the region’s granite slopes, the Gamay imparts a fresh, directly fruity yet mineral character to the wines, best reflected in our Beaujolais wine reviews.

At the highest quality level, the Beaujolais wine region contains 10 crus — communes that have the right to wear their own appellations on the label: Brouilly, Chénas, Côte de Brouilly, Chiroubles, Fleurie, Juliénas, Morgon, Moulin-à-Vent, Régnie Reviews and St-Amour. One-step below is Beaujolais Villages, with Beaujolais itself as the broadest, most generic appellation. Our Beaujolais wine guide contains hundreds of Beaujolais wine ratings.

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Showing 1 thru -8 of 841
94
points

Domaine Louis-Claude Desvignes 2006 Javernières Gamay (Morgon)

  • Cellar Selection

A majestic wine, great Beaujolais by any standard. The fruit is tense, structured, dense, with black figs, strawberry jelly and ripe red plums fitting well into the texture. It manages to be both fruity and firmly structured. This is Beaujolais for aging, an impressive wine ready to mature over five years or more.

 — R.V.  (11/1/2009)
93
points

Château des Jacques 2012 Clos de Rochegrès Gamay (Moulin-à-Vent)

  • Cellar Selection
  1. $50

This Beaujolais comes from a dense granite vineyard that has produced an equally powerful wine. It’s mineral in texture, with aromatic black fruits that have been given a taste of wood from 12 months barrel aging. The acidity at the end as well as the tannins promise aging, so drink from 2017.

 — R.V.  (11/1/2014)
93
points

Château des Jacques 2012 Côte de Py Gamay (Morgon)

  1. $50

The power and complexity of wines from the slope of the Côte de Py is very evident in this wine. Densely argued, it is a solid wine with red fruits and a strong minerality from the volcanic soil. The acidity and tannic structure promise aging, and the wine will be best drunk from 2016.

 — R.V.  (11/1/2014)
93
points

Château de Bellevue 2009 Le Clos Gamay (Morgon)

  1. $42

A dark and dense wine that has solid tannins and tight, juicy acidity. Its texture is very mineral, firm, complex and still needing to age. From a single vineyard in Morgon, it offers the powerful side of a Beaujolais cru, powered both by fruit and by structure. Drink now.

 — R.V.  (11/1/2014)
93
points

Château des Jacques 2011 Clos du Grand Carquelin Gamay (Moulin-à-Vent)

  • Cellar Selection

Beautifully perfumed, this has swathes of ripe cherry and plum, with a hint of wood aging. The balance is already well established, with a line of crisp acidity that sits behind the rich, sweet fruit. With its tannins, this needs to age for at least three years.

 — R.V.  (3/1/2013)
93
points

Château des Jacques 2006 Clos de Rochegrès Gamay (Moulin-à-Vent)

  1. $35

Exploding with perfumes, aromas of violets, sweet cherries and spice, this is an impressive wine, with wild cherries and damson plums. It is taut, almost Pinot Noir in its velvet texture, finishing with ripe, sweet fruit sustained by tannins.

 — R.V.  (11/1/2009)
92
points

Henry Fessy 2009 Gamay (Fleurie)

  1. $20

A richly aromatic wine, with swathes of sweet fruit, ripe tannins and a juicy, jammy feel. This is so generous, open, welcoming. There is structure as well, cushioned by the sweet fruits.

 — R.V.  (10/1/2011)
92
points

Henry Fessy 2009 Gamay (Saint-Amour)

  • Cellar Selection
  1. $20

Ripe, rounded and generous, a warm plum juice-flavored wine. There is power and concentration. It is a very complete, ageworthy wine, although accessible now.

 — R.V.  (10/1/2011)
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Showing 1 thru -8 of 841
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