European Editor


Reviews wines from Portugal and France.

Gigondas Wines

Located in France's Southern Rhône, Gigondas produces wines that are rich Grenache-based blends, thanks in part to the region’s Mediterranean climate and red clay-alluvial soils. Under the AOP regulations, only red and rosé wines may be produced; white wines are simply declassified to Côtes-du-Rhône status. A mandated 50% Grenache is required in the wine, with Mourvèdre and/or Syrah usually accounting for the bulk of the remaining blend—adding structure, savory tones and color intensity to Grenache’s alcoholic power and lush richness. These wines are often compared to the great wines of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, but can even offer better value. To discover the best bottles of the region, visit our Wine Ratings.

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Showing 1 thru -8 of 115
94
points

Château Saint-Cosmé 2001 Cuvée Valbelle Red (Gigondas)

  1. $53
This wine is all about potential. At present, with the powerful tannins and layers of wood, the fruit is only showing early signs of richness. But over time, this is going to develop into a superb wine, powering through from the tannins to enormous, concentrated dark fruits and layers of herbal flavors.  — R.V.  (3/1/2004)
94
points

Domaine la Roubine 2001 Red (Gigondas)

This is a beautiful, stylish, impressively elegant yet intensely powerful wine. It has juicy, sweet fruit, dusty intense tannins and beautiful perfumed aroms. Herbs and black plums give depth of flavor to a wine that will age over many years.  — R.V.  (3/1/2004)
93
points

Montirius 2006 Confidential Red (Gigondas)

  • Cellar Selection
  • Online Exclusive
From a small single parcel in Gigondas, this shows remarkably pure cola and plum fruit, pointed up by plenty of richness on the palate. Compared to Montirius’s 2006 Terre des Aînés, its tannins are chewier and softer at the same time, making it approachable now, yet capable of lasting at least through 2020.  — J.C.  (12/15/2009)
93
points

Château de Saint-Cosme 2004 Hominus Fides Red (Gigondas)

  • Cellar Selection
  1. $50
A bit closed on the nose, but the potential of this wine is obvious. Crafted from 110-year-old Grenache, the flavors are intense, bathing the palate in layers of plum pudding, anise and chocolate. A huge wine in need of at least five years. Owner Louis Barruol suggests 15 years may be a better bet.  — J.C.  (11/15/2006)
92
points

Tardieu-Laurent 2009 Vieilles Vignes Red (Gigondas)

  1. $44
Despite incredible levels of ripeness—evidenced by notes of chocolate and dried fruit—this wine features a bit of garrigue on the nose and licorice flavors on the palate, which together impart a sense of freshness. Full bodied and richly textured, it ends in a silky dusting of cocoa powder-like tannins. Drink now–2020.  — J.C.  (10/1/2013)
92
points

Domaine du Grand Montmirail 2009 Cuvée Vieilles Vignes Red (Gigondas)

  • Editors' Choice
  1. $40
This is a top-notch effort—a blend of 80% Grenache, 15% Syrah and 5% Mourvèdre. It starts off with intriguing floral and herbal notes, then delivers deep black-cherry flavors on the palate, tinged with savory nuances of roasted meat and black olive. It’s full bodied and round, richly but finely textured and very drinkable now yet with the substance to age up to 10…  — J.C.  (7/1/2012)
92
points

Domaine Santa Duc 2006 Hauts Garrigues Red (Gigondas)

  • Cellar Selection
  • Online Exclusive
More reserved, backward and tannic than the domaine’s 2006 Tradition, this wine features similar aromas of garrigue and flavors of chocolate, black olive, plum and spice. It’s firm on the finish, but boasts sufficient fruit to see it through. Drink 2012–2020.  — J.C.  (12/15/2009)
92
points

Château de Saint-Cosme 2004 Valbelle Red (Gigondas)

  • Cellar Selection
  1. $40
A blend of 90% Grenache and 10% Syrah, all from vines averaging 80 years of age, this is a stupendously concentrated wine that still possesses nuance and complexity. Exotic spices—notably lavender and clove—scent the bouquet, while the huge palate boasts layers of plum fruit and thick, velvety tannins. Drinkable now, but probably at its best after 2012.  — J.C.  (11/15/2006)
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Showing 1 thru -8 of 115
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