Managing Editor


Reviews wines from Australia, New Zealand and the Rhône.

Rhône Valley Wines

Much larger in scale than Burgundy is the Rhône Valley wine region. From the alcoholic and powerful highs of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, through the dense elegance of the Syrah wines of appellations like Côte-Rôtie and Hermitage, this is predominantly red wine country. Rich and generous, these wines appeal to wine drinkers used to California reds. And, just like Bordeaux, there is also great value to be found in this region: wines labelled Côtes du Rhône. If they have a village name attached (Rasteau and Seguret are among the best), they will be that much better even if more expensive. Search our Rhône Valley wine guide’s hundreds of Rhône Valley wine reviews for more details on individual wines and for our comprehensive database of Rhône Valley wine ratings.

Showing 1,801 thru -1,808 of 2,191
85
points

La Vieille Ferme 2010 White (Luberon)

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  1. $9
A modest, crisp white for immediate consumption, this is cleanly made and refreshing, with fruit-driven notes of passion fruit, pear and pineapple. The blend contains Grenache Blanc, Bourboulenc, Ugni Blanc and Roussanne.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Vignobles La Coterie 2010 Passe Colline Red (Ventoux)

This is a soft, gentle wine, made for immediate consumption. It features bright cherry and pear-drop aromas and pleasant, if somewhat simple, fruit flavors. Two-thirds Grenache, with the rest being a blend of Syrah, Carignan, Cinsault and Mourvèdre.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Vignobles La Coterie 2010 Pierre du Diable Red (Ventoux)

Less bright and perfumed than La Coterie’s Passe Colline bottling, this is still a soft, approachable wine with ample cherry fruit. Hints of leather and white pepper give it a bit of complexity. The blend is 65% Grenache, 25% Syrah and 10% Carignan.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Domaine de Tara 2009 Hautes Pierres Red (Ventoux)

Powerfully built, with masses of cherry fruit backed by firm tannins. A bit unusual for the region, with 80% Syrah and only 20% Grenache, but it workss, yielding a tough, dense wine that should age well for 5–6 years.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Michel Gassier 2009 Nostre Païs Red (Costières de Nîmes)

  1. $18
Different in style from many Costières de Nîmes, this is exceptionally spicy, with clove and cinnamon notes that play a dominant role in the wine’s flavor profile, gently rolling over the brown sugar and sour plum elements. The blend is Carignan, Mourvèdre, Cinsault, Grenache and Syrah. Drink now–2015.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Domaine Fincham 2007 Red Note Grenache-Syrah (Costières de Nîmes)

  1. $18
This mature example of Costières de Nîmes should be consumed over the next six months or so for its appealing savory characters of leather and dried fruit. It’s medium bodied, with a silky finish that should make it easy to pair with anything from chicken to lamb.  — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
85
points

Les Vignerons de Tavel 2010 Cuvée Tableau Rosé (Tavel)

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  1. $18
A pale raspberry in color, this rosé is almost too young at this point, with some flint and passion fruit notes over berry fruit. Give it another six months and try it in the early spring, by which time it should have opened up a bit.  — J.C.  (10/1/2011)
85
points

Jean-Luc Colombo 2009 Les Abeilles White (Côtes du Rhône)

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This full-bodied, creamy-textured white comes across as a bit heavy, although it does display ample honey and pear flavors. Drink it over the next six months.  — J.C.  (10/1/2011)
Showing 1,801 thru -1,808 of 2,191