Managing Editor

Joe Czerwinski

Reviews wines from Australia, New Zealand and the Rhône.

Rhône Valley Wines

Much larger in scale than Burgundy is the Rhône Valley wine region. From the alcoholic and powerful highs of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, through the dense elegance of the Syrah wines of appellations like Côte-Rôtie and Hermitage, this is predominantly red wine country. Rich and generous, these wines appeal to wine drinkers used to California reds. And, just like Bordeaux, there is also great value to be found in this region: wines labelled Côtes du Rhône. If they have a village name attached (Rasteau and Seguret are among the best), they will be that much better even if more expensive. Search our Rhône Valley wine guide’s hundreds of Rhône Valley wine reviews for more details on individual wines and for our comprehensive database of Rhône Valley wine ratings.

Showing 1,801 thru -1,808 of 2,397
86
points

Mas Carlot 2010 Cuvée Tradition White (Costières de Nîmes)

This wine starts off slowly, with only faint scents of oranges, but then it delivers bold, assertive flavors of those same oranges, filled out by hints of honeyed ripeness. It does turn a bit warm on the finish; drink it over the next few months.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Ogier 2010 Heritages Rosé (Côtes du Rhône)

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  1. $12

Four different grape varieties go into this well-made rosé, but the result is still somewhat straightforward, largely plums and cherries. It’s medium in body, yet does show a trace of warmth on the finish.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Vignobles La Coterie 2010 Passe Colline Rosé (Ventoux)

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This rosé is vibrant flamingo-pink in color, with subtle aromas of cherries and white chocolate. In the mouth, it’s medium bodied, becoming steadily more intense until it finishes with a burst of citrusy fruit and a hint of silky tannin.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Château Beaubois 2009 Elegance Red (Costières de Nîmes)

  1. $16

Although this is aimed at a slightly higher target than Beaubois’s entry-level Expression cuvée, it comes across as just slightly more tannic, with a fine balance of blackberries, olives and earth on the midpalate but a touch of coarseness to the finish. 80% Syrah, 20% Grenache. Drink 2012–2015.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Domaine Juliette Avril 2009 Red (Ventoux)

This blend of Grenache and Syrah from Châteauneuf-based Juliette Avril is refreshingly light in body and tannin. The herb and cherry aromas and flavors go down easy and finish crisp.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Gabriel Meffre 2009 Château Grand Escalion Red (Costières de Nîmes)

From its pungent aromas of asphalt and black olive to its firm, drying tannins, this is a sturdy if somewhat tough and unyielding example of Costières de Nîmes red.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Marrenon 2009 Private Gallery Syrah-Grenache Red (Luberon)

  1. $12

With no oak (this blend of 80% Syrah and 20% Grenache is aged exclusively in stainless steel), this is a bright, fruit-forward example of Luberon rouge, medium bodied, with cherry fruit and subtle leather and spice nuances. Drink it over the next year or two.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
86
points

Vindemio 2009 Regain Red (Ventoux)

  1. $16

Proprietor Jean Marot’s entry-level blend of 70% Grenache and 30% Syrah is aged entirely in cement and stainless steel, resulting in a fruit-driven, medium-bodied red that delivers cherry fruit, supple tannins and a slightly peppery finish. Drink now–2014.

 — J.C.  (12/15/2011)
Showing 1,801 thru -1,808 of 2,397
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