Rosé

French for “pink”, Rosé is used to describe a category of refreshing wines that are pink in color but are made from red grapes. There are three ways to make rosé wine: skin contact, saignée and blending. There are many different styles of rosé, and the resulting wines are usually a result of both the grapes and techniques used. You can use Wine Enthusiast’s online Buying Guide to find the top-rated Rosé among our extensive Rosé wine reviews and easy-to-use database. Our Rosé reviews will give you a general idea what to expect from wines made from Rosé, and will help you find one that best suits your needs.

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93
points

Château d’Esclans 2011 Garrus Rosé (Côtes de Provence)

  • Cellar Selection
  1. $90
A powerful, wood-aged rosé that shows great richness, density and structure. Treat this as a fine wine and you’ll appreciate the texture, the mature berry fruits, the spice and vanilla flavors. Weighty and full in the mouth, this could even age well for another year or two.  — R.V.  (7/1/2013)
93
points

Château d’Esclans 2010 Garrus Rosé (Côtes de Provence)

  1. $90
This delicious wine offers subtle barrel nuances, with ripe plum and strawberry fruits. Along with this is a stylish crispness, just touched by spice and toast. This is a serious wine, intended for food.  — R.V.  (7/1/2012)
92
points

Château Sainte Marguerite 2013 Cru Classé Grande Réserve Rosé (Côtes de Provence)

  • Editors' Choice
  1. $29
The palest of grey-pink rosés, this is classy, fresh and fragrant. It has a light, orange-zest texture as well as tannins and a mineral edge. Very fresh, it is also worth aging a few months.  — R.V.  (7/1/2014)
92
points

Château Vignelaure 2013 Rosé (Coteaux d'Aix-en-Provence)

  • Editors' Choice
  1. $23
This is a rich, smooth, vanilla-flavored wine that is impressively ripe while keeping all its freshness. It has a sense of concentration, with ripe strawberry and red cherry fruits and enough structure to allow it to age. Drink from 2015.  — R.V.  (7/1/2014)
92
points

Château d’Esclans 2012 Garrus Rosé (Côtes de Provence)

  1. $100
This full-bodied wine pushes the concept of rosé to its limits. Wood-aged and rich, it conveys a sense of structure, mature fruit and delicious toastiness. It has already been aged an extra year, but would benefit from cellaring even longer, so wait until 2015.  — R.V.  (7/1/2014)
92
points

Minassian-Young 2011 Grenache-Cinsault Rosé (Paso Robles)

  • Editors' Choice
  1. $16
California rosé is awfully hard to get right. It’s usually too sweet, too heavy or both. With this Grenache-Cinsault blend, Minassian-Young knocks it out of the park. The wine is dry, delicate, modest in alcohol, and complex, with subtle peach, rosehip tea, orange zest, watermelon and spice flavors. A great bargain, but only 64 cases were produced.  — S.H.  (7/1/2013)
92
points

Château Vignelaure 2011 Rosé (Coteaux d'Aix-en-Provence)

  1. $21
This is a vibrantly rich wine that is brimming with delicious red fruit notes and bright acidity. Full and concentrated, it has weight without being heavy. It is a finely made wine, with a crisp finish.  — R.V.  (7/1/2012)
92
points

Domaine des Diables 2013 Bonbon Rosé (Côtes de Provence Sainte-Victoire)

  • Editors' Choice
  1. $29
This rosé needs to age. It has a zesty, crisp and mineral texture that is tight and nervy. As it softens, more red fruits will come to the front, although the structure will remain, making this a serious rosé for drinking with food.  — R.V.  (7/1/2014)
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